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  1. Jo Gates said, on February 13, 2012 at 1:37 pm

    High-quality service-learning exemplifies these engagement tactics. “Tinkering” is key to learning many skills, especially technology and science. If the rules say, “Don’t touch that computer! You might break it!” then the joy of playful learning is shut down.

    These are great things to keep in mind whenever working with students–in and out of the classroom. We included students in a recent multi-day conference to design out-of-school programs to increase engagement in science and math. It made a huge difference that the students were full participants. Their input was invaluable. Treating the young participants as responsible members of our learning community, and having norms for the conference that encourage engagement, brought out great ideas and collaborative spirit in all.

    Among the important ideas that came up, student choice and incorporating games are on this list. We need to keep these in mind whenever students learn–in class and outside of school.

  2. […] Do Your Rules Lead to Student Engagement and Meaningful Learning? Nine guidelines… (kidsconsortium.org) […]

  3. llcullen said, on February 13, 2012 at 8:43 pm

    Thanks for mentioning my blog-post that ASCD Smart Brief was kind enough to publish. I am very happy it struck a chord with you and I am so thrilled you got something valuable from it.
    Many thanks
    Lori
    http://www.attheprincipalsoffice.wordpress.com

  4. Nina said, on February 19, 2012 at 3:01 am

    Meaningful learning is the only sustainable learning and teaching practice.

    One thing I would add to the list above is authentic communication. All too often we teachers are asking fake questions (i.e. asking a question even though we already know the answer) A typical fake question is for example: “what is the weather like today?”, because you most likely did not spend your night at school, and have already been exposed to the outdoor and fresh air, and thus know what the weather looks like. An authentic question could include inquiring the student’s opinion or her/his understanding, and of course is an open-ended question instead of a simple yes/no, right/wrong answer question.

  5. […] Do Your Rules Lead to Student Engagement and Meaningful Learning? Nine guidelines… (kidsconsortium.org) […]

  6. […] Do Your Rules Lead to Student Engagement and Meaningful Learning? Nine guidelines… (kidsconsortium.org) […]

  7. […] Do Your Rules Lead to Student Engagement and Meaningful Learning? Nine guidelines… (kidsconsortium.org) […]

  8. […] Do Your Rules Lead to Student Engagement and Meaningful Learning? Nine guidelines… (kidsconsortium.org) […]


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